theme by dystopie
Tapping a Maple on a Cold Vermont Morning
Hi I'm Grace



andrope:

i added subtle sass.

andrope:

i added subtle sass.




femmenace-t:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:
1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”
2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”
3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”
4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

Always reblog

femmenace-t:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

Always reblog




onepointperspective:

The perspective of a square.

onepointperspective:

The perspective of a square.













allthingslinguistic:

Talking Canadian

This is an old but good documentary on Canadian English: what it sounds like, where it comes from, and how it’s changing, complete with interviews with Jack Chambers and other linguists, cheesy props, and someone dressed up as Rev. A. Constable Geikie.

From the description on the CBC website

Why do English-speaking Canadians talk the way we do? Why do we say couch instead of chesterfield, and windshield instead of windscreen? How did French words like portage and prairie become part of the vocabulary, and native words like beaver and tobacco part of everyday speech?

Few of us are aware that the language we speak has less to do with conscious choice than it does with our past: when and why we came to Canada, where we settled, and the tug of war between British and American influences that has been part of our lives for centuries.

Talking Canadian is a light-hearted exploration of the way we spoke in the past, how we speak today, and how we will likely talk in the future.




thetruthaboutcatsanddogs:

yes, totally




owlturdcomix:

But you can’t hide.